RMQSI Answers ForumCategory: General Questions and CommentsCalculation of Mean seviceable life
baigamin asked 12 years ago

Aslam-o-Alaikum

Allah Hafiz
Aslam-o-Alaikum

Allah HafizAslam-o-Alaikum

Allah HafizAslam-o-Alaikum

Allah HafizAslam-o-Alaikum

Allah HafizAslam-o-Alaikum

Allah HafizAslam-o-Alaikum

Allah Hafiz

1 Answers
smorris answered 12 years ago

If you are predicting reliability for electronics using, say MIL-HDBK-217, there is no way to predict service life (that I know of) from this type of analysis. When you use these standards, you are predicting the failure rate during “useful life” – the flat part of the bathtub curve. How long something will last, its “life”, is driven by when it starts to wearout, the far right hand side of the bathtub curve. For electronics, this could be 20, 40, 60, or more years. The “service life” is often driven by how long some organization wants to continue to maintain a system. For some systems, they are technologically obsolete after five years – think your old 20 GB hard drive, when you can buy a new 1,000 GB for $150 – for most, the “service life of the 20 GB drive is done. Other times, systems that were planed to stay in service for, say only 20 years, get upgrades to extend their service life much longer (e.g., B-52 Bomber is still flying many years past its initially planned service life). For non-repairable items, for example tires on a car, the service life is usually easy to assess – when they start to wearout, commonly 50,000 miles.